Lemon Tart with Fresh Fruit

DSC_0722

It’s dessert night tonight with family friends! I made a lemon tart, lemon tartlets, and baked lemon cream. I’ve already used this recipe before in this post, but this time I used a recipe for an actual tart dough. I made a pâte sablée using the recipe in The Art of French Pastry by Jacquy Pfeiffer. Almond flour has a wonderful smell and adds a subtle flavor to the dough. I made a full recipe, which is twice the amount that I actually needed, so I ended up making six tartlets, two mugs full of baked lemon cream, and about 15 cookies in addition to the lemon tart:

DSC_0718

I could have made more than six tartlets; it probably could have been closer to twelve tartlets, considering the immense amount of lemon cream that I had leftover after the six tartlets… Any way, things to remember for next time, especially since I didn’t roll the dough so thin this time around, and that pâte sablée is such a delicious dough.

A few things happened that were stressful and unfortunate: I failed to pre-make the dough yesterday, so it was a decent scramble this morning because I also failed to read the recipe in enough detail to see that the butter had to be softened for this crust. And, with the egg yolks in the recipe… this also means the yolks had to come to room temperature too. This lead to a restless morning and early afternoon anxiously trying to hurry along the cooling process before rolling out the dough, and then again between setting the tart crust in the pan and letting it cool again. There was much anxiety to be had. AND the horrible fact that the tart must be baked, cooled to room temperature, then chilled before serving for an 8pm dessert gathering. Awful experience. I shall never do this again. I’m usually a plan-and-do-ahead kind of person, and this is precisely the reassurance I need for my ways.

DSC_0711

The tart shell didn’t pull away from the wall as much as the last tart did, so that was quite nice and resulted in an uncracked tart shell to house the wonderful lemon cream. And, did I mention, pâte sablée is so good. The description I read matched the taste and textures in my mouth. Only, mine wasn’t as flaky as it could have been, but that’s probably because of improper dough resting time. sigh. At least now I know, right? I can now say, from tactile experience, I know with incredible certainty that a dough must spend at least 5 hours in the refrigerator between the time it first balls to the time you work with it again. (It was also a lot harder to roll out since it wasn’t at a low enough temperature to start with, and the dough kept sticking.)

As for the tartlets, remember that they crust will bake faster, and try very hard not to spill the lemon cream into the part of the crust that is touching the pan wall. I just made these in a muffin tin. I’ve attempted to hide the burnt edges of the crust, and I sadly lost a tartlet to the muffin tin… because I was not so good at avoiding the crack between the crust and the tin.

DSC_0715

And, of course, lemon cream was so beautiful. Truly a fantastic summer dessert! Just add a couple of summer fruits (berries) and a dollop of whipped cream. It’s not heavy, it’s light. Best (or worst, depending on if you’re a party pooper) part is you don’t feel like you’re eating as much as you are.

The lemon cream recipe is from the blog From The Kitchen, on this post The Ultimate Lemon Tart. So delicious!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s